Hendricks County Flyer, Avon, IN

Local News

March 8, 2013

Ohio gaming cutting into Indiana’s piece of the pie

CINCINNATI, Ohio — Standing inside the glittering, 400,000-square-foot Horseshoe Casino in the heart of this city’s downtown, Steve Rosenthal sounded like a happy man as he greeted an Indiana reporter who’d come for a sneak peek of Ohio’s newest gambling hall.

As a partner in Rock Gaming, the company developing the $400 million venue, he’s counting on Ohio’s neighbors to cross the state border with fistfuls of cash and credit cards in hand.

“I would love to have Hoosiers come visit us,” Rosenthal said. “The casino is just one more reason to come to Cincinnati.”

Sounds so cordial, doesn’t it? But Ohio’s decision to get into the lucrative world of gaming is posing a serious threat to Indiana’s share of casino dollars and prompting a Statehouse debate about how to respond.

The Horseshoe Casino is the fourth big-city casino launched in the Buckeye state in 10 months, and the closest one to the Indiana border. In location and amenities, it’s designed to be enticing: Just a short hop off the interstates that run through the city, the upscale casino is fronted by a crystal-chandeliered, glass-walled entryway that offers a sweeping view of the city’s downtown.

Open 24/7, it features 2,000 slot machines, 87 table games, a VIP players’ lounge with limits as high as $50,000 a hand, a World Series of Poker room, a private bar for big spenders (and one for low-rollers, too), and three outward-facing restaurants, including singer Jimmy Buffet’s Margaritaville.

Also inside are 1,700 employees, eager to make customers feel welcome enough to willingly part with their money.

Ohioans long resisted Las Vegas-style gambling, sure of the ills it would bring. Three times, the state’s voters turned down gambling measures on the ballot before finally approving legalized casinos in 2009.

What changed? Hurting from the recession and the related deep cuts in state services when tax revenues plunged, voters decided the estimated $1 billion being wagered annually by Ohio residents in neighboring states like Indiana needed to stay home.

“They were ready to recapture those dollars,” said Matt Shuler, executive director of the state’s Casino Control Commission. The theme of the pro-casino campaign, Shuler said, was “Ohio needs the money.”

Ohio only had to look to Indiana to see how fruitful gambling could be. Since the mid-1990s, when it became the sixth state in the nation to legalize casino gaming, Indiana has raked in more than $10 billion in casino taxes and drawn millions of gamblers across state lines. Last year, Indiana’s 13 riverboat, land-based, and racetrack casinos saw $2.7 billion in gross gaming revenues and paid more than $450 million in wages and benefits to more than 14,000 employees.

The American Gaming Association ranks Indiana as the third largest commercial gambling market in the nation.

“Indiana is a gaming state,” said Senate Minority Leader Tim Lanane, whose district includes the Hoosier Park racetrack casino in Anderson. “That’s just the case.”

But fortunes are changing. There are now 23 states with a cut of the action, and more than 1,200 commercial casinos competing for gaming dollars. More than half the states with legalized casinos have gotten into the game since 2008.

Indiana saw the problems coming. Three years ago, state fiscal analysts predicted the arrival of casinos in Ohio, coupled with casino expansion in Illinois and Michigan, would cut deeply into the competition for gambling dollars and the hefty tax revenue stream that helps fund essential public services in Indiana. Now they’re witnessing their fears.

In the short months they’ve been open, the casinos in Toledo, Columbus, and Cleveland have earned more than $404 million and generated $133 million in taxes. With Cincinnati, the total casino revenues in Ohio are predicted to hit almost $1 billion a year.

Meanwhile, Indiana is on a losing streak. Admissions and revenue are down over the last three years. Patronage at the state’s riverboat and land-based casinos have fallen under two million for the past five consecutive months. That’s the longest such streak in a decade, said Ed Feigenbaum, who tracks the numbers for his Indiana Gaming Insight newsletter.

“Things are only going to get worse,” Feigenbaum said. The additional casinos aren’t expanding the gaming market, he said, they’re “cannibalizing the market.”

January was a particularly gruesome month. Combined, Indiana’s five floating casinos on Lake Michigan saw the lowest revenues since December 2001. The six southern Indiana casinos had their worst month since January 2003.

Indiana legislators are trying to come to grips with the grim news. A bill that recently passed the state Senate would grant tax breaks to the state’s 10 riverboat casinos and allow them to relocate nearby to dry land. And it would give Indiana’s racetrack-casinos the ability to operate table games like craps, roulette, and blackjack.

But the complicated legislation, described by Feigenbaum as a “Rube Goldberg device,” faces an uncertain future in the House.

Opponents fear the tax breaks will cut too deeply into the tax revenue streams that the state and local communities where the casinos are located have come to rely on. And Republican House Speaker Brian

Bosma of Indianapolis said the bill may be seen as an expansion of gambling — something his conservative caucus members will oppose.

Tim Lanane fears the legislation will simply die.

“This issue is ‘Can we wait another year?’” Lanane said. “In my opinion, if we put it off, the problem will only become more severe.”

1
Text Only
Local News
  • Author featured in documentary Mike McCarty, CEO of Safe Hiring Solutions here, was featured in the final episode of the Investigative Channel Documentary series "Very Bad Men," which aired yesterday. The final episode focuses on McCarty's book Choking in Fear, which is a memoir o

    April 16, 2014

  • Indiana Academic Standards released The Indiana Department of Education (DOE) and Center for Education and Career Innovation (CECI) recently released the final draft of proposed academic standards for math and English/language arts that will guide Hoosier teachers as they create lesson

    April 16, 2014

  • Free skin cancer screenings offered The Dermatology Center of Indiana is offering free skin cancer screenings from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 22 and from 7:30 a.m. to noon May 10 and 17 at the new Zionsville location, 6639 Whitestown Parkway. For more information, call 732-8980 or visit t

    April 16, 2014

  • HCF 4-16 news broady death pix Man arrested for OWI resulting in wife's death AVON — A Cicero man has been arrested in connection with an accident that killed his wife over the weekend. Brandon Broady, 26, was charged with operating a vehicle while intoxicated resulting in death. As of press time on Tuesday, the Avon Police De

    April 16, 2014 1 Photo

  • NASA's 'Destination Station' set to land in Indianapolis Starting April 19, residents of Indianapolis and surrounding areas are invited to experience NASA's Destination Station, a traveling multimedia exhibition designed to highlight how the International Space Station (ISS) came to be, what life is like o

    April 16, 2014

  • Danville Rotary Club presents golf outing The Danville Rotary Club will host the Harold Martin Open golf outing on May 15 at Twin Bridges Golf Club in Danville. The annual outing raises funds that are used to benefit Sycamore Services. The outing begins at 11 a.m. with lunch provided by Mayb

    April 16, 2014

  • Downtown Danville Partnership launches beautification effort Homeowners and businesses in Danville are invited to participate in a new beautification effort started here before the upcoming Mayberry in the Midwest festival on May 17-18. The Downtown Danville Partnership has formed a Main Street Beautification

    April 16, 2014

  • School board implements honors diploma DANVILLE -- The school board here agreed to implement a DHS Honors Diploma starting with the freshman class of 2018, next year. "We found, over time, that there is an unintended consequence when you have weighted grades, and that consequence is if a

    April 16, 2014

  • HCF 4-16 news musical pic 1 New musical coming to DCHS DANVILLE -- Danville Community High School will be putting on its annual musical the first weekend in May in the high school auditorium. "Thoroughly Modern Millie," based on the 1967 movie starring Julie Andrews and Mary Tyler Moore, will be performe

    April 16, 2014 3 Photos

  • HCF 4-16 news danville police pic 1 Danville Police officers recognized DANVILLE -- Police officers here were recognized last week by Town Council President Marcia Lynch, for their hard work in handling a difficult situation. The accomplishments of the officers were presented to the board by Chief Bill Wright. Support S

    April 16, 2014 1 Photo

House Ads
Hendricks County Marquee
Email News Sign Up
Facebook
Twitter Updates
Follow us on twitter
Poll

New poll question: Will you be attending this year’s Indianapolis 500?

Yes
No
Undecded
     View Results
AP Video
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Must Read